PORSCHE CONCEPT CARS

959 Prototype

918 Spyder Concept

On the eve of the Geneva Auto Show, the Stuttgart-based company took the wraps off the 918 Spyder Concept, a 2-seat mid-engine supercar with hybrid and electric drive technology.

Just how fast is this thing? Well, Porsche says the 918 Spyder Concept hits 100 km/h (62 mph) in less than 3.2 seconds, and it blasts to a top speed of 198 mph. Not only that, it laps the Nürburgring in less than 7 minutes 30 seconds, which means it's even faster than the hallowed Carrera GT.Having a big sale, on-site celebrity, or other event? Be sure to announce it so everybody knows and gets excited about it.

959 Prototype

Tapiro Concept

There’s a good chance you’ve never heard of the mid-engine 1970 Porsche Tapiro concept, a one-off Volkswagen/Porsche exercise designed by Giorgetto Giuigaro built on a 914-6 chassis for the Turin Motor Show in 1970.

The design is a clear departure from what other Porsches looked like at the time, and it resembled a lot of the wedge-shaped, sharp-edged sports cars that came after it (e.g., BMW M1). Behind the driver sat a heavily modified 2.4-liter H6 engine claimed to make 220 hp at 7,800 rpm. Of course, the “supercar” had rear-wheel drive, but what happened after it was shown in Turin and the Los Angeles Imported Automobile and Sports Car Show in 1971 is where things get a little murky. Tapiro faced a cruel end, and it still hasn’t been restored -- it sits in its burned state inside the Italdesign Museum to this day

959 Prototype

959 Prototype

The Porsche 959 is a sports car manufactured by German car manufacturer Porsche from 1986 to 1993, first as a Group B rally car and later as a road legal production car designed to satisfy FIA homologation regulations requiring at least 200 units be produced.

911 Speedster Concept

Porsche 911 Speedster Concept. The Speedster has returned! Aside from switching to a red dress, the second 911 Speedster concept has been fitted with different 21-inch center-lock wheels with an attractive cross-spoke wheel design reminiscent of the 911 RSR and GT3 R race cars. Speaking of which, the daytime running lights are tinted like on some race cars and are finished in red to complement the body.

For a contrasting effect, black chrome and platinum have been used for those interesting side mirror caps and also for the fuel tank cap centrally located on the hood. While the original “Heritage” concept had a light brown Aniline leather upholstery, the new one adopts a partly perforated black leather with eye-catching red accents.

Aside from the different finish inside and out, the concepts are exactly the same and are both based on the 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet. Porsche borrowed the 911 GT3’s chassis and built the frunk and trunk from carbon fiber composite to keep the weight low. The exhaust system was engineered by the company’s GT department with titanium tips, while the six-speed manual gearbox and the flat-six naturally aspirated engine with more than 500 horsepower also wear the GT’s signature.

Boxster Concept

With consumer access to the internet in its infancy, and before carmakers began staging their own spy photos, it was still possible in 1993 to truly “unveil” a concept car. It’s worth looking in the rearview mirror at a top-secret concept that 25 years ago took the media and public by surprise and then played an outsized role in steering its maker’s destiny: the Porsche Boxster.

The instant that Porsche executives pulled the cover off the Boxster, the silver concept became the star of the 1993 North American International Auto Show in Detroit. A two-seat, mid-engine roadster, the Boxster oozed heritage by evoking 1950s and ’60s Porsche race cars, including the 550 Spyder and 718 RSK. But it was an original—not “retro”—design.

The Boxster Concept signaled something even more critical than a new design direction. This was about survival. The Boxster offered the promise of a new, more affordable Porsche sports car at a time when the company’s future was a question mark.

959 Gruppe B

The Porsche 959 is a sports car manufactured by German car manufacturer Porsche from 1986 to 1993, first as a Group B rally car and later as a road legal production car designed to satisfy FIA homologation regulations requiring at least 200 units be produced.

The twin-turbocharged 959 was the world's fastest street-legal production car when introduced, achieving a top speed of 197 mph (317 km/h), with some variants even capable of achieving 211 mph (339 km/h). During its production run, the 959 was considered as the most technologically advanced road-going sports car ever built, and forerunner of all forthcoming sports cars. It was one of the first high-performance vehicles with all-wheel drive, providing the basis for Porsche's first all-wheel drive 911 Carrera 4 model. Its performance convinced Porsche executives to make all-wheel drive standard on all turbocharged versions of the 911 starting with the 993. The twin-turbo system utilized on the 959 also made its way to future turbocharged Porsche sports cars. In 2004, Sports Car International named the 959 number one on its list of Top Sports Cars of the 1980s.